Tag Archive | health

Will Single Women Decide The Outcome Of The 2012 Presidential Election?

The 2012 Presidential Election is close and election day is fast approaching. The next United States President will select several appointees for the United States Supreme Court. The Romney/Ryan ticket opposes abortion and Planned Parenthood. Obama/Biden takes an alternative position on abortion and Planned Parenthood.

“An Investor’s Business Daily/TIPP poll released this week shows that single women favor Obama sixty-three (63) to twenty-three (23) percent, while married women favor Romney fifty-one (51) to forty-one (41) percent. The Voter Participation Center found that single women are the fastest growing large voting group in the country when it comes to sheer numbers.”[i]

About fifty-five (55) million unmarried women will be able to vote in the 2012 Presidential Election. There are more female eligible voters than male, and the proportion of eligible women who will vote is expected to surpass men. With that said, many political analysts argue that single women will determine the outcome of the 2012 Presidential Election and the next as well. As a result, this Presidential Election, women voters have been heavily courted by both presidential candidates.

Will women allow the Romney/Ryan ticket overturn historic legal questions that have been decided concerning women’s health? Decades ago, women’s right to self-determination concerning their health were settled by the US Supreme Court. Under a Romney/Ryan Administration, we may be forced to relitigate settled legal questions about a woman’s right to birth control and abortion. Will well settled legal questions about a woman’s right to self-determination be deemed unconstitutional under a Romney/Ryan administration or will we as a nation return the Obama/Biden ticket to the White House for a second term and in doing so continue to move forward in the area of women’s rights?

The latest presidential polls show the race is tied. That means your vote is going to matter. But, it can’t matter, unless you vote on Tuesday.Take action that can and will change the future. On November 6, 2012, seize the opportunity to cast your vote. As was aptly stated by President Johnson when discussing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, “The vote is the most powerful instrument ever devised by man for breaking down injustice and destroying the terrible walls which imprison men because they are different from other men.”

Each election day, countless eligible voters deprive themselves of their voting right through complacency or apathy. Don’t be among them—exercise your right to vote.

Source (s):Wikipedia. “On Election Day, Single Women Could Sway The Vote”, Elizabeth Flock U.S. News & World Report, November 2, 2012.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

[i] “On Election Day, Single Women Could Sway The Vote”, Elizabeth Flock U.S. News & World Report, November 2, 2012.


[i]  “On Election Day, Single Women Could Sway The Vote”, Elizabeth Flock U.S. News & World Report, November 2, 2012.

Join the Battle Against Breast Cancer

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month is fast approaching. The month of October has been designated as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM).  It has been reported that the first NBCAM program took place in October 1985. It was a week-long event. The overarching objective of the event was to fill the information void in public communication about breast cancer.

Despite on-going cancer research, cancer still attacks 10,000,000 people per year worldwide.  Annually, 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer and nearly 555,000 people will die in our nation this year alone. According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women.

In 2006 (the most recent year numbers are available)—

  • 191,410 women were diagnosed with breast cancer.*†
  • 40,820 women died from breast cancer.*†

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States, aside from skin cancer.[i] Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women (after lung cancer).[ii] Although African-American women have a slightly lower incidence of breast cancer after age 40 than Caucasian women, they have a slightly higher incidence rate of breast cancer before age 40.[iii] However, African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer at every age. Breast cancer is much less common in males; by comparison, the disease is about 100 times more common among women.[iv] According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 1,910 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed among men in the United States in 2009.[v]

If you are concerned about developing breast cancer, or if you know someone who has  been diagnosed with the disease, one way to deal with your concerns is to gather  as much information as is available. For more information, you can visit the websites for: American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , and the National  Cancer Institute.

†Source(s): U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer  Statistics: 1999–2006 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report.  Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute; 2010. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/uscs. www.nbcam.org.

*Note: Incidence counts cover approximately 96% of the U.S. population and death counts cover 100% of the U.S. population. Use caution in comparing incidence and death counts.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art


[ii] Ibid.

[iii] Ibid.

[iv] Ibid.

[v] Ibid.

WORLD CANCER DAY

 

February 4th 2012 is “World Cancer Day”.  Each year, preventing cancer and raising quality of life for cancer patients are recurring themes on “World Cancer Day”.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer is a leading cause of death around the world. WHO estimates that 84 million people will die of cancer between 2005 and 2015 without intervention.

Annually, 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer and nearly five hundred fifty-five thousand (555,000) people will die in our nation this year alone. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.) According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), breast cancer
is the most common form of cancer in women.

In 2006 (the most recent year numbers are available)—

•           191,410 women were diagnosed with breast cancer.*†

•           40,820 women died from breast cancer.*†

If you are concerned about developing breast cancer, or if you know someone who has been diagnosed with the disease, one way to deal with your concerns is to gather as much information as is available. For more information, you can visit the websites for: American
Cancer Society
, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Cancer
Institute.

†Source: U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2006 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report. Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute; 2010. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

*          Note: Incidence counts cover approximately ninety-six (96) percent of the United States population and death counts cover one hundred (100) percent of the U.S. population. Use caution in comparing incidence and death counts.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art.

Family and Medical Leave Inclusion Act (H.R. 2364, S. 1283)

 

For almost two decades, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) has afforded employment protected leave for workers to care for their new-born baby, sick family members, or to recover from their own serious illnesses. It has been reported that since the enactment of FMLA millions of Americans have been able to take up to twelve (12) weeks of unpaid leave from work. Some assert that FMLA has proven essential to achieving greater employee retention and reducing employee turnover.  The Family and Medical Leave Inclusion Act (H.R. 2364, S. 1283) would not change the terms of the FMLA, but rather expand its coverage to more family members.

H.R. 2364 amends the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 and title 5, United States Code, to permit leave to care for a domestic partner, parent-in-law, adult child, sibling, grandchild, or grandparent who has a serious health condition, and for other purposes. While protections afforded workers under FMLA have helped millions of families, they do not show the many care-taking roles that workers may have, forcing many to  choose between employment and responsibility to care for an ill family member. Many assert that all of America’s workers should be afforded the opportunity to fulfill their critically important family and caregiver roles while continuing to contribute to our nation’s economy. This belief led US Congresswoman Maloney to introduce legislation in the House of Representatives and Senator Durbin to introduce a similar piece of legislation in the Senate.

If this is an important issue to you, let your elected officials know about your support of this legislation. Let your voice be heard in Washington, DC. Get involved.

Sources: www.govtrack.us.  http://www.opencongress.com. http://www.ifebp.org. Action Alert 9 to 5. www.lawheadlinesandnews.com/hd/index.php? =Family+Act+Leave.consultarehr.com/tag/work-family-balance/. “Bill Would Extend FMLA Benefits and Protections to Additional Family Members”, Washington DC Employment Law Update, Ilyse Schuman, July 1, 2011.

Photocredit: Microsoft Clip Art

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Constitutional

In March of this year, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act turned two years old. On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed a sweeping set of health care reforms into law. It was a historic moment in our nation’s history. Barack Obama was the first American president that was able to deliver a comprehensive health reform. This was a goal which eluded his predecessors. Since its enactment, it has been highly debated and challenged in the courts.

Today, in a 5-4 ruling, the United State Supreme Court upheld President Obama’s signature legislation, The Affordable Care Act. Chief Justice John Roberts provided the critical swing vote in this ruling. We all deserve high-quality health care that we can all afford, and today brings this goal to reality.

The United State Supreme Court’s ruling means that:

Children will no longer be denied health insurance due to a pre-existing condition, effective immediately.

Young adults can stay on their parent’s health insurance policy until age 26.

Adults will no longer be denied health insurance due to a pre-existing condition, effective in 2014.

Health insurance providers can no longer cancel your policy because you get sick.

Creates state-based marketplaces where people can easily compare and shop for insurance beginning in 2014.

Prevents insurance companies from charging women more than men and overcharging those who need care the most.

Gives hard-working Americans tax credits so they can afford insurance beginning in 2014.

Provides Americans with rebates from insurers who spend too much on CEO bonuses or advertisements.

Ends insurance company power to raise rates without justification.

There can no longer be annual limits to health coverage. If your illness is incredibly expensive, you will no longer have to worry about reaching a limit to what your insurance company will pay.

Is there a need for the 2010 The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hereinafter “Affordable Care Act”)? Let’s look at the number of uninsured in America. This nation’s deep economic recession and resulting decline in employer sponsored coverage contributed to a rise in the uninsured in recent years. Research indicates that these factors left fifty (50) million Americans without coverage in 2009.

While public insurance programs prevented some individuals from losing health insurance coverage, these programs do not reach all of those who cannot afford insurance. With that understanding, the Affordable Care Act seeks to address the gaps in our private-public insurance system. This new law requires most Americans to have health insurance and many will gain coverage through expanded Medicaid eligibility and subsidized private coverage for individuals with incomes up to four hundred (400) percent of poverty starting in 2014.

The United States Supreme Court’s ruling in this case was a victory for Americans concerned about access to healthcare for all. As stated in an article in Mother Jones, “The largest expansion of the American welfare state since the Great  Society stands, upheld by the most conservative Supreme Court in  decades. Yet the decision is not simply a landmark ruling, it is a  monumental setback for a conservative movement strategy meant to sabotage, by all available means, the presidency of Barack Obama.”

Sources: The White House. CBS News. Chicago Sun-Times. http://www.healthcare.gov; http://www.whitehouse.gov/healthreform/healthcare-overview; http://www.democraticleader.house.gov/; http://www.dpcsenate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill; The Kaiser Family Foundation, “Focus on Health Reform.” “Obamacare Lives: What Next?” by Adam Serwer, Mother Jones, June 29th, 2012.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Nurses Day

Today is recognized as International Nurses Day. Each year, on May 12th, the anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth, nurses are celebrated on International Nurses Day. This day was established to recognize the contribution nurses make to the health and well-being of our society. Inspired by nurses like Florence Nightingale and Elizabeth Fry, the International Council of Nurses started this annual event forty-seven (47) years ago. Every year, there is a different theme for the day. This year, the theme is: “Closing The Gap: Increasing Access and Equity”.

On International Nurses Day, we honor the life-saving abilities of nurses around the world. Whether by putting you at ease while you wait for your doctor or taking your health history, the variety of critical health related services nurses provide is seemingly endless. Every day, nurses take care of countless patients. Each May 12th, we can demonstrate our support and appreciation for nurses world-wide by acknowledging their important work.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Source(s): International Council of Nurses.

An Abusive Relationship

When discussing the topic of romantic relationships, people often inquire about the characteristics of an abusive relationship. It is important not only to know the characteristics of an abusive relationship but it is equally important to know what constitutes a healthy relationship. A health relationship has been defined as one where it functions to increase self esteem of both participants in the relationship. An abusive relationship is one in which the victim’s sense of self is diminished. Let’s look closer at the characteristics of both types of relationships.

Healthy Relationships

–  Partnership:                     There is shared responsibility.

–  Economic equality:           Freedom exists related to issues of work, school, and money.

–   Emotional Honesty:        Both parties feel safe to share fears and insecurities.

–   Sexual Respect:               Accepts that no means no.

–  Physical Safety:                Respects partner’s space and discusses issues without violence.

–  Supportive/Trusting:      Listens and understands, values partner’s opinion, and sensitive to other’s needs.

Abusive Relationships

–          Domination:                             Abuser decides. Servant-Master relationship.

–          Economic Control:                   Withholds money.

–          Emotional Manipulation:         Uses jealousy, passion, and stress to justify actions.

–          Sexual Abuse:                          Treats partners as sex object.

–          Physical Abuse:                        Hit, choke, kick, punch, pull hair, twist arms, trip, bite.

–          Controlling:                               Isolates partner from friends.

–          Intimidating:                            Charming in public but menacing in private.

The behaviors listed above are not comprehensive. The information should simply serve as a brief overview and to encourage the reader to seek more information. For further information on the topic of domestic violence, there are many websites that can provide comprehensive information including but not limited to: http://www.thehotline.org; www.ncadv.org; and www.pcadv.org.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art