Tag Archive | AIDS/HIV

World AIDS Day 2016

holding hands around globe

December 1 is World AIDS Day. World AIDS Day is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV.

Over the past quarter-century, twenty-five (25) million lives have been lost to HIV/AIDS, but remarkable strides have also been made in halting the disease’s progression.

Only 28 percent of the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV have the infection under control, increasing the risk that they will spread the disease to others, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. One in five U.S. adults infected with HIV are not aware that they have the virus.

For years, people can be infected with the AIDS virus without manifesting symptoms. Of those who are aware, only half receive ongoing medical care and treatment for the illness, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in its latest report on HIV in America.

Concerned Man on Laptop

Fortunately, HIV/AIDS is preventable. Nevertheless, each year, HIV/AIDS continues to destroy countless lives. HIV/AIDS takes the greatest toll among African-Americans, Latinos and MSM of all races. Fighting the spread of HIV and AIDS has been an uphill battle for over 30 years. This disease has disproportionately affected the black community.

One in sixteen African American men and one in thirty-two African American women will be diagnosed with HIV during their lifetime. The rate of new infections among blacks is seven times the rate among whites. Among Hispanics, the rate of new HIV infections is three times as high as that among whites. And according to a recent CDC analysis, the HIV diagnosis rate among MSM is forty-four (44) times that of other men.

praying woman

One out of four HIV cases in our nation are among women and girls, thirteen years of age and older; and two out of three of these women and girls are African-American. “Socioeconomic and cultural factors—including poverty, discrimination, and inadequate access to health care, among others—often render black women more vulnerable to HIV than other racial/ethnic groups.

smiling mother and daughter

Many women of color are paralyzed by fear—of being stigmatized, of abandonment by their partners, and of deportation by immigration authorities. Fear of being stigmatized by HIV/AIDS appears to have at least some relationship to people’s decisions about whether or not to get tested for HIV. But most important for women of color who are often the family caregiver and breadwinner, they are afraid of their families’ reactions to either their HIV status or disclosure of sexual orientation.

women of color

What we know about the social and cultural impact on Black women’s lives is that HIV-related stigma and denial regarding how the disease is spread, particularly among self-identified heterosexuals who are positive, and stigmatization about the disease remains an enormous barrier to effectively fighting the epidemic.”

praying Latina woman

Given these grim statistics, this pressing public health issue challenges each of us to be “our sisters’ keepers.” This World AIDS Day, you can choose to make a difference in the lives of others. Toward that end, take action in the fight against HIV and raise awareness of its impact on women and girls. Get tested. Encourage every female within your sphere of influence to be tested for HIV/AIDS. Additionally, you can plan or support HIV prevention efforts in your community.

The fight against HIV and AIDS is a fight we can one day win. We must work together to end this insidious epidemic and eradicate this disease. With an equal amount of conscience, mind, heart, and collective action, each of us can educate members of our community about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the importance of knowing your HIV status. For further information about HIV/AIDS, visit the Centers for Disease Control’s website at http://www.cdc.gov.

Source(s): MSN. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2009.; Evaluate website. Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative (AAALI). MSNBC.com, “Few Americans With HIV Have Virus Under Control”, November 29, 2011.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

World AIDS Day 2013

hands with red bands

World AIDS Day is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV. December 1 is World AIDS Day. Over the past quarter-century, twenty-five (25) million lives have been lost to HIV/AIDS, but remarkable strides have also been made in halting the disease’s progression.

Only 28 percent of the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV have the infection under control, increasing the risk that they will spread the disease to others, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. One in five U.S. adults infected with HIV are not aware that they have the virus. For years, people can be infected with the AIDS virus without manifesting symptoms. Of those who are aware, only half receive ongoing medical care and treatment for the illness, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in its latest report on HIV in America.

Fortunately, HIV/AIDS is preventable. Nevertheless, each year, HIV/AIDS continues to destroy countless lives. HIV/AIDS takes the greatest toll among African-Americans, Latinos and MSM of all races. Fighting the spread of HIV and AIDS has been an uphill battle for over 30 years. This disease has disproportionately affected the black community. One in sixteen African American men and one in thirty-two African American women will be diagnosed with HIV during their lifetime. The rate of new infections among blacks is seven times the rate among whites. Among Hispanics, the rate of new HIV infections is three times as high as that among whites. And according to a recent CDC analysis, the HIV diagnosis rate among MSM is forty-four (44) times that of other men.

One out of four HIV cases in our nation are among women and girls, thirteen years of age and older; and two out of three of these women and girls are African-American. “Socioeconomic and cultural factors—including poverty, discrimination, and inadequate access to health care, among others—often render black women more vulnerable to HIV than other racial/ethnic groups. Many women of color are paralyzed by fear—of being stigmatized, of abandonment by their partners, and of deportation by immigration authorities. Fear of being stigmatized by HIV/AIDS appears to have at least some relationship to people’s decisions about whether or not to get tested for HIV. But most important for women of color who are often the family caregiver and breadwinner, they are afraid of their families’ reactions to either their HIV status or disclosure of sexual orientation. What we know about the social and cultural impact on Black women’s lives is that HIV-related stigma and denial regarding how the disease is spread, particularly among self-identified heterosexuals who are positive, and stigmatization about the disease remains an enormous barrier to effectively fighting the epidemic.”

Given these grim statistics, this pressing public health issue challenges each of us to be “our sisters’ keepers.” This World AIDS Day, you can choose to make a difference in the lives of others. Toward that end, take action in the fight against HIV and raise awareness of its impact on women and girls. Get tested. Encourage every female within your sphere of influence to be tested for HIV/AIDS. Additionally, you can plan or support HIV prevention efforts in your community.

The fight against HIV and AIDS is a fight we can one day win. We must work together to end this insidious epidemic and eradicate this disease. With an equal amount of conscience, mind, heart, and collective action, each of us can educate members of our community about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the importance of knowing your HIV status. For further information about HIV/AIDS, visit the Centers for Disease Control’s website at http://www.cdc.gov.

Source(s): MSN. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), HIV Surveillance Report: Diagnoses of HIV infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2009.; Evaluate website. Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative (AAALI). MSNBC.com, “Few Americans With HIV Have Virus Under Control”, November 29, 2011.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

2011 United States Conference on AIDS (USCA)

Date: November 10-13, 2011

Venue: Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers

Location: Chicago, IL

Contact: conferences@nmac.org or (202) 483-NMAC (6622)

URL: http://www.nmac.org/index/2011-usca

“The United States Conference on AIDS (USCA), set for November 10-13, 2011, at Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, in Chicago, IL, is an event you cannot afford to miss. For nearly two decades, USCA has sought ‘to increase the strength and diversity of the community-based response to the AIDS epidemic through education, training, new partnerships, collaboration and networking.’

It is the largest AIDS-related gathering in the U.S., bringing together over 3,000 workers from all fronts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic—from case managers and physicians, to public health workers and advocates, people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/As) to policymakers—to build national support networks, exchange the latest information and learn cutting-edge tools to address the challenges of HIV/AIDS. We hope you will be one of them.” –Paul A. Kawata, The Executive Director of the National Minority AIDS Council

Sources:National Minority AIDS Council.  Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

2011 United States Conference on AIDS

Date: November 10-13, 2011

Venue: Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers

Location: Chicago, IL

Contact: conferences@nmac.org or (202) 483-NMAC (6622)

URL: http://www.nmac.org/index/2011-usca

“The United States Conference on AIDS (USCA), set for November 10-13, 2011, at Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, in Chicago, IL, is an event you cannot afford to miss. For nearly two decades, USCA has sought ‘to increase the strength and diversity of the community-based response to the AIDS epidemic through education, training, new partnerships, collaboration and networking.’

It is the largest AIDS-related gathering in the U.S., bringing together over 3,000 workers from all fronts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic—from case managers and physicians, to public health workers and advocates, people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/As) to policymakers—to build national support networks, exchange the latest information and learn cutting-edge tools to address the challenges of HIV/AIDS. We hope you will be one of them.” –Paul A. Kawata, The Executive Director of the National Minority AIDS Council

Sources:National Minority AIDS Council.  Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Celebrate, Honor, and Revere Grandparents on Sunday, September 11, 2011: National Grandparent’s Day 2011

Today, Sunday, September 11, 2011, is National Grandparent’s Day. Grandparents’ Day was founded to champion the cause of lonely elderly persons residing in nursing homes and to encourage their grandchildren to tap into the wisdom and heritage their grandparents could provide. It has grown to be a special day for all to celebrate the roles grandparents play in the family unit.

On National Grandparents’ Day, it is a great idea for grandchildren to identify favorite photos in the family albums with their grandparents. Countless joyous memories can be derived from viewing the photo albums. National Grandparent’s Day is a time to discover one’s roots and learn patience, understanding and appreciation for the elderly. National Grandparents Day is an ideal time to enhance communication between generations.

For more than thirty years, we have formally celebrated the role of grandparents in the lives of their grandchildren as a nation. In 1978, the United States Congress passed
legislation proclaiming the first Sunday after Labor Day as National Grandparents Day. President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation. Now more than ever before, we should celebrate grandparents and the expanding role they are playing in the lives of their grandchildren. Don’t forget to honor your grandparents on National Grandparents Day, Sunday, September 11th. For further information on National Grandparents Day, visit www.grandparents-day.com.

Sources: Wikipedia. www.grandparents-day.com. Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art.

Hidden Victims

Over 15 million children in our nation live in homes where there has  been at least one incident of domestic violence in the past year, and  seven million children live in families where severe partner violence  has occurred. Data indicates that 30% to 60% of perpetrators of intimate  partner violence also abuse children in the home. Growing up in abusive  household can pose a threat to not only the child’s physical health but  his mental health as well.

Research indicates that the non-abusive parent is often one the most  important protective factors in the lives of children who witness  domestic violence. All women, children, and men have the right to live  in a safe environment and to conduct their lives without emotional,  physical or sexual abuse or the fear of abuse.

Often, one of the greatest concerns for battered women is the affect  of living in a violent home environment on children. In some instances,  the domestic becomes so severe that women with children leave their  homes without a place to go. Research indicates that domestic violence  is a leading cause of homelessness. In a 2007 report by the United  States Conference of Mayors, thirty-nine percent of the city leaders who  were surveyed identified domestic violence as a primary cause of  homelessness among households with children.

Victims of domestic violence experience difficulty finding housing.  There simply are not sufficient beds to house all the battered women and  their children seeking shelter. The U.S. Conference of Mayors report  indicated that city leaders turn persons experiencing homelessness away  from shelters and transitional housing because of lack of capacity all  or some of the time. Not only do battered women experience challenges in  securing a bed in a shelter, they also often have difficulty securing a  safe, decent, affordable apartment.

Domestic violence thrives on apathy. It can be eradicated with an  equal amount of conscience, mind, heart, and collective action. How you  can help? Advocate for increased funding for domestic violence programs  and public housing.

Sources:United  States Conference of Mayors. Center for Diseaese Control & Prevention (CDC), National Domestic Violence Hotline, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. McDonald, Renee, Ernest N. Jouriles, Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler, et al. 2006. Estimating the Number of American Children Living in Partner-Violent Families; Edelson, J.L. (1999). “The Overlap Between Child Maltreatment and Women Battering.” Violence Against Women. 5:134-154; U.S. Conference of Mayors. 2007. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities: A 23-City Survey. Washington, DC.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Grandparent’s Day 2011

National Grandparent’s Day was founded to champion the cause of lonely elderly persons residing in nursing homes and to encourage their grandchildren to tap into the wisdom and heritage their grandparents could provide. It has grown to be a special day for all to celebrate the roles grandparents play in the family unit. In 2011, National Grandparent’s Day will be celebrated on Sunday, September 11, 2011.

As National Grandparents Day approaches, it is a great idea for grandchildren to identify favorite photos in the family albums with their grandparents. Countless joyous memories can be derived from viewing the photo albums. National Grandparent’s Day is a time to discover one’s roots and learn patience, understanding and appreciation for the elderly. National Grandparents Day is an ideal time to enhance communication between generations.

For more than thirty years, we have formally celebrated the role of grandparents in the lives of their grandchildren as a nation. In 1978, the United States Congress passed
legislation proclaiming the first Sunday after Labor Day as National Grandparents Day. President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation. Now more than ever before, we should celebrate grandparents and the expanding role they are playing in the lives of their grandchildren. Don’t forget to honor your grandparents on National Grandparents Day, Sunday, September 11th. For further information on National Grandparents Day, visit www.grandparents-day.com.  Sources: Wikipedia. www.grandparents-day.com. Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art.