Tag Archive | adolescents

National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month: He loves me… He loves me not…

Stress

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. Teen Dating Violence (DV) Prevention and Awareness Month is a national effort to raise awareness about abuse in teen and 20-something relationships and promote programs that prevent it during the month of February.

Like domestic violence, teen dating violence is a pattern of controlling, and abusive behaviors of one person over another within a romantic relationship. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and financial abuse. It can occur in both heterosexual and homosexual relationships. It knows no boundaries and crosses race, socio-economic status, culture, and religion. Violence can happen to anyone.

Annually, 1 out of 11 adolescents reports being a victim of physical dating abuse (CDC 2006). Many of these cases of teen dating violence could have been prevented by helping adolescents to develop skills for healthy relationships with others (Foshee et al. 2005). Like adults, teenagers can choose better relationships when they learn to identify the early warning signs of an abusive relationship, understand that they have choices, and believe they are valuable people who deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

Access to information is integral to breaking the cycle of violence. Toward that goal, I would like to direct your attention to very help informational resources related to domestic violence intervention, prevention, and community outreach. For further information on teen dating violence, here are several websites you can visit: http://www.thesafespace.org; and http://www.breakthecycle.org.

Sources: Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). http://www.thesafespace.org; and http://www.breakthecycle.org. Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

37th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes

Event Dates: October 19-22, 2011

The 37th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes will be a three (3) day event held from October 19-22, 2011 in Miami Beach, Florida. The meeting announcement indicates that there will be plenary sessions, symposia, paper and poster sessions, and workshops addressing the cutting edge science of pediatric diabetes care.

The theme of the 2011 meeting will be “Possibilities for Prevention of Diabetes and its Complications.” Alan Delamater, Conference President, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, states that, “We all work to prevent complications in our patients with diabetes. The best chances for accomplishing this is through integrated comprehensive care addressing medical, behavioral, and psychosocial needs and this issue will be highlighted in the meeting. We will also focus on primary prevention of diabetes. My colleague and co-chair of the organizing committee, Jay Skyler, MD, will lead a special session on the latest efforts to prevent type 1 diabetes in children, and we will also have sessions focusing on obesity and type 2 diabetes.”

Venue: Miami Beach, Florida.

Website: http://2011.ispad.org

Organized by: K.I.T. Group GmbH.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Teen Dating Violence

Teens are seriously at risk for dating violence. Annually, 1 out of 11 adolescents reports being a victim of physical dating abuse (CDC 2006). Like domestic violence perpetuated by adults, teen dating violence is a pattern of controlling, and abusive behaviors of one person over another within a romantic relationship. Teens who abuse their girlfriends or boyfriends often act the same as adults in abusive relationships. Research shows that physical or sexual abuse is a part of 1 in 3 high school relationships. Many of these cases of teen dating violence could have been prevented by helping adolescents to develop skills for healthy relationships with others (Foshee et al. 2005).

Teen dating violence is just as serious as adult domestic violence. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and financial abuse. It can occur in both heterosexual and homosexual relationships. It knows no boundaries and crosses race, socio-economic status, culture, and religion. Violence can happen to anyone. Like adults, teenagers can choose better relationships when they learn to identify the early warning signs of an abusive relationship, understand that they have choices, and believe they are valuable people who deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

This month, many of my posts have addressed issues related to breaking the cycle of domestic violence and exposing myths about this phenomenon. Access to information is integral to breaking the cycle of violence. Toward that goal, I would like to direct your attention to very help informational resources related to domestic violence intervention, prevention, and community outreach. For further information on teen dating violence, here are several websites you can visit: www.thesafespace.org; and www.breakthecycle.org.

Unlike every other public health problem, violence permeates the psyche of every man, woman, and child who reside in our extended community. Our society appears to be waiting on a miracle or an outside intervention to change the status quo. The only way we will eradicate domestic violence is when we agree upon coordinated solutions to implement in a collaborative manner. Violence is a condition of the heart that can only change when individual citizens decide that it is time for a change…that it is time for the violence to cease.

Sources: Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). www.thesafespace.org; and www.breakthecycle.org. Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

37th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes

Date: 19 to 22 October 2011

Venue: Miami Beach, Florida, United States

Website: http://2011.ispad.org

Organized by: K.I.T. Group GmbH

Deadline for abstracts/proposals: 31 May 2011

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

“The Challenge and Promise of the Cyberworld: Bullying Prevention in the Age of the Internet” Conference 2010

Bullying is a growing problem not only in the United States but in other countries as well. Research indicates that the misuse of technology has helped to escalate the level of violence experienced by victims. In some cases, children and youth have decided that the only way to escape the bullying was to end their lives. This growing phenomenon has caused professionals across various disciplines to come together to discuss prevention strategies.

The 7th Annual Conference of the International Bullying Prevention Association will take place from November 15 – 17, 2010, at the Washington State Convention & Trade Center in Seattle, Washington. At this year’s conference the theme is “The Challenge and Promise of the Cyberworld: Bullying Prevention in the Age of the Internet.”

To learn more about this upcoming event, you can read more about the conference in the following press releases issued by the International Bullying Prevention Association and Committee for Children issued news releases on November 4th to promote the conference:

International Bullying Prevention Association News Release: <http://www.ibtimes.com/pr/articles/633167/20101104/youth-on-bullying-major-study-examines-what-students-say-works-effectively-and-what-does-not.htm>;

Committee For Children News Release: <http://news.yahoo.com/s/usnw/20101104/pl_usnw/DC95763>

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

The Many Faces of Bullying

The Many Faces of Bullying: North American Conference

March 5-6, 2011

Toronto, Canada

Unfortunately, bullying is a growing problem. Research indicates that the misuse of technology has helped to escalate the level of violence experienced by victims. In some cases, children, youth, and even adults have decided that the only way to escape the bullying was to end their lives. This growing phenomenon has caused professionals across various disciplines to come together to help save lives.

The Many Faces of Bullying Conference will be held in March of 2010 in Toronto, Canada. This is a 2-day intensive conference with internationally-known keynote speakers and breakout sessions full of practical insights, approaches & resources for addressing the growing challenge of bullying. The topics which will be covered include but are not limited to:

  • Long-Term Effects of Bully Victimization
  • Cyberbullying: Research Findings and Implications
  • Identify Popular Online Environments Among Adolescents  and Recognize Various Forms of Cyberbullying
  • Understand the Potential Emotional, Psychological, and Behavioral Consequences of Cyberbullying
  • Texting/Sexting Addiction and It’s Exploitation in Bullying
  • Bullycide: Trends and Preventions
  • Empowering the Bystanders

This international conference will bring together professionals throughout North America to focus on the many forms of youth bullying.  For further information on the conference, visit http://www.facesofbullying.com/. Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Nichelle Mitchem Discusses Teen Dating Violence

Like domestic violence, teen dating violence is a pattern of controlling, and abusive behaviors of one person over another within a romantic relationship. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and financial abuse. It can occur in both heterosexual and homosexual relationships. It knows no boundaries and crosses race, socio-economic status, culture, and religion. Violence can happen to anyone.

Annually, 1 out of 11 adolescents reports being a victim of physical dating abuse (CDC 2006). Many of these cases of teen dating violence could have been prevented by helping adolescents to develop skills for healthy relationships with others (Foshee et al. 2005).

Like adults, teenagers can choose better relationships when they learn to identify the early warning signs of an abusive relationship, understand that they have choices, and believe they are valuable people who deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

For further information on teen dating violence, here are several websites you can visit: www.thesafespace.org; and www.breakthecycle.org.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art