Tag Archive | 99%

Reject Any Cuts to SNAP in the Farm Bill

Scared Child

June is national hunger awareness month. Ironically, the U.S. House Agricultural Committee voted to give more subsidies to big agribusiness and cut food aid for 2 million families, children, and senior citizens. Drastic cuts like these are not a necessity. But rather this was a choice to support tax breaks for the wealthy and big businesses (like Apple) by literally taking food from hungry kids. The full U.S. House of Representatives votes soon on whether or not to cut funds for SNAP.

Please contact your members of Congress to tell them to reject any cuts to SNAP in the Farm Bill. It is already a national sin and a shame that one in five children in America are at risk of hunger while companies like Apple skirt taxes on at least $74 billion in profit. Currently, Congress is poised to funnel more subsidies to profitable corporate agriculture companies. This is yet another example of legislation that favors corporations and the 1% over the 99%.

Our voices are more important than ever. Harmful automatic cuts (sequestration) to human needs programs are chipping away at critical and effective anti-hunger initiatives. There are efforts to cut SNAP (formerly food stamps) and international food aid in the farm bill.

Please call your members of Congress today and amplify the stories of others seeking to fight hunger in the world by sharing your own. Tell your members of Congress what drives you to work toward ending hunger?

Join the choir of Bread For the World activists taking to Capitol Hill on June 11, 2013. Let’s show Congress what a movement to end hunger looks like. It’s not too late to come to Lobby Day on Tuesday of this week. But even if you can not be with their for Lobby Day, you can still participate right where you are. Here’s how:
•Call or email your members of Congress today.
•Ask them to
1.Protect SNAP and improve international food aid in the farm bill.
2.Replace sequestration with a balanced plan that includes both revenues and sensible cuts.
•Share your story about why you are a Bread for the World member and why SNAP, international food aid, sequestration, and ending hunger matter to you.
•You can include additional facts from our Lobby Day talking points.

It is simply outrageous and morally wrong to give money to highly profitable large corporations at the expense of America’s children who rely on food aid. With that said, contact your members of Congress to tell them to reject any cuts to SNAP in the Farm Bill.

Personal stories like yours are what will move your members of Congress to act. So don’t delay. Help amplify the message that we can and must end hunger.

Source(s): AFL-CIO; Bread For the World

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art.

US Senate Said No To The Ryan Budget

Child Post

The US Senate resounding rejected the Ryan Budget Plan. Ryan’s Budget Plan severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Poverty in America not only affects the millions of people who are deprived of the common necessities to live, but it also affects the idea of progression and hopefulness in this country. The more than 46 million people in America living in squalor, poverty, and hunger are not invisible. Their concerns must be our concerns.

Had the Senate like the House passed the Ryan Budget, it would have struck a very serious blow to vulnerable children and families far into the future. Millions of children were in danger of budget cuts to vital health and income supports. House budget chair Paul Ryan, in his budget plan would rather the money go to defense spending and tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.

Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts in the Ryan Budget Plan would have come from vital programs, while much of the savings goes to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts. The members of the house supporting the Ryan Budget Plan opted to balance our federal deficit on the backs of the most vulnerable. Ally of Ryan’s budget proposals fail to create a circle of protection around programs vital for hungry and poor people in our country and abroad.

The Ryan Budget Plan would have gouged the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by billions, and turns it into a block grant, which would prevent SNAP from responding to economic downturns. Additionally, the proposed budget cuts the funding levels negotiated by Congress last August, and it eliminates the protections established for all major low-income entitlement programs. It also would have slashed other crucial programs, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, WIC, and Head Start. International food aid and poverty-focused foreign assistance would have also been deeply cut. Cuts to this vital funding would have endangered lives and our own national security.

The Ryan Budget Plan would have cut Medicaid funding by 20 percent next year, gutting a popular program that helps more than 28 million needy children receive care. And Medicaid would have been slashed by one-third over 10 years. By defunding the Affordable Care Act (health reform), millions more would also lose out on the chance for coverage. Education would have been hard hit, too, with billions slashed to services kids need to compete in the future. Pell Grants, which help students afford college, would have faced a budget freeze, and the interest some pay for student loans could double.

As an advocate for indigent children, youth, and families, I see the impact of poverty and need on those that we serve every day. I know first-hand, what poverty and dependence look like and how they destroy lives, hopes, dreams, and aspirations. We pray and cry with children who are hungry and parents who have lost hope. It is what we are, it is what we do.

In spite of the seemingly limitless prosperity that many Americans enjoy, millions of others are going hungry, foregoing medical care, doing without winter coats and gloves, struggling to break free from poverty. Last year, 46.2 million Americans lived below the poverty line – $22,314 a year for a family of four – marking the fourth year in a row that poverty has increased.

With 46.2 million residents, Poverty, USA, is the largest state in America. Today, the unemployment rate stands at 8.6 percent and despite recent economic growth more than 43 million Americans -including 14.7 million children – live in poverty, the highest in the more than 50 years that the data has been tracked. Yet a recent Gallup poll found that only 5% of Americans believe poverty and homelessness are important problems for the country. So let’s look at some facts and make our own determination:

Over 25 percent of the children in the US under the age of six live in poverty. The poverty rate among women climbed to 14.5 percent in 2010 from 13.9 percent in 2009, the highest in 17 years. As poverty surged last year to its highest level since 1993, median household income declined, leaving the typical American household earning less in inflation-adjusted dollars than it did in 1997. One out of every six Americans is now being served by at least one government anti-poverty program. Child homelessness in the United States is now 33 percent higher than it was back in 2007. More than 50 million Americans are now on Medicaid, the U.S. government health care program designed principally to help the poor.

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, 1.6 million American children “were living on the street, in homeless shelters or motels, or doubled up with other families last year”. The percentage of children living in poverty in the United States increased from 16.9 percent in 2006 to nearly 22 percent in 2010. One out of every seven mortgages in the United States was either delinquent or in foreclosure during the first quarter of 2010.

The number of children living in poverty in the U.S. has risen for four years in a row. There are 10 different U.S. states where at least one out of every four babies is born to a family living in poverty. 28 percent of all U.S. households have at least one member that is looking for a full-time job. There are seven million children in the United States today that are not covered by health insurance at all.

Hundreds of advocates for families in crisis have called members of the US House of Representatives and the Senate about the Ryan Budget Plan. Like leading economists, we have analyzed the Ryan Budget Plan, and the news was bad for all people who are struggling. Ryan’s proposed budget cuts the highly effective Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by 17 percent over the next 10 years. This would have put millions more American families at risk of hunger. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reports that the cuts are so severe that most of the government—aside from health care, Social Security, and defense—would cease to exist by 2050.

The Ryan Budget Plan would have severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts would have come from these vital programs, while much of the savings would have gone to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts.

The US Senates decision to resounding reject the Ryan Budget Plan reminds advocates and others that we can only make a difference when we take action.

“You may never know what results come of your action, but if you do nothing there will be no result. ~ Gandhi

Source(s): Action Alert Voices for Americas Children. Action Alert Bred For the World. St. Vincent de Paul Society. National Center on Family Homelessness

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Say No To The Ryan Budget Plan

cute little girl continuing to paint

This week, the Congress will vote on the Ryan budget plan. Ryan’s Budget Plan severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Poverty in America not only affects the millions of people who are deprived of the common necessities to live, but it also affects the idea of progression and hopefulness in this country. The more than 46 million people in America living in squalor, poverty, and hunger are not invisible. Their concerns must be our concerns.

If passed, the Ryan budget plan would strike is a very serious blow to vulnerable children and families far into the future. Millions of children are in danger of budget cuts to vital health and income supports. House budget chair Paul Ryan, in his budget plan would rather the money go to defense spending and tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.

Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts in the Ryan Budget Plan comes from vital programs, while much of the savings goes to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts. The members of the house supporting the Ryan budget plan are opting to balance our federal deficit on the backs of the most vulnerable. This proposal fails to create a circle of protection around programs vital for hungry and poor people in our country and abroad.

The Ryan Budget Plan gouges the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by billions, and turns it into a block grant, which would prevent SNAP from responding to economic downturns. Additionally, the proposed budget cuts the funding levels negotiated by Congress last August, and it eliminates the protections established for all major low-income entitlement programs. It also slashes other crucial programs, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, WIC, and Head Start. International food aid and poverty-focused foreign assistance would also be deeply cut. Cuts to this vital funding would endanger lives and our own national security.

The Ryan plan cuts Medicaid funding by 20 percent next year, gutting a popular program that helps more than 28 million needy children receive care. And Medicaid is slashed by one-third over 10 years. By defunding the Affordable Care Act (health reform), millions more could also lose out on the chance for coverage. Education is hard hit, too, with billions slashed to services kids need to compete in the future. Pell Grants, which help students afford college, would face a budget freeze, and the interest some pay for student loans could double.

As an advocate for indigent children, youth, and families, I see the impact of poverty and need on those that we serve every day. I know first-hand, what poverty and dependence look like and how they destroy lives, hopes, dreams, and aspirations. We pray and cry with children who are hungry and parents who have lost hope. It is what we are, it is what we do.

In spite of the seemingly limitless prosperity that many Americans enjoy, millions of others are going hungry, foregoing medical care, doing without winter coats and gloves, struggling to break free from poverty. Last year, 46.2 million Americans lived below the poverty line – $22,314 a year for a family of four – marking the fourth year in a row that poverty has increased.

With 46.2 million residents, Poverty, USA, is the largest state in America. Today, the unemployment rate stands at 8.6 percent and despite recent economic growth more than 43 million Americans -including 14.7 million children – live in poverty, the highest in the more than 50 years that the data has been tracked. Yet a recent Gallup poll found that only 5% of Americans believe poverty and homelessness are important problems for the country. So let’s look at some facts and make our own determination:

Over 25 percent of the children in the US under the age of six live in poverty. The poverty rate among women climbed to 14.5 percent in 2010 from 13.9 percent in 2009, the highest in 17 years. As poverty surged last year to its highest level since 1993, median household income declined, leaving the typical American household earning less in inflation-adjusted dollars than it did in 1997. One out of every six Americans is now being served by at least one government anti-poverty program. Child homelessness in the United States is now 33 percent higher than it was back in 2007. More than 50 million Americans are now on Medicaid, the U.S. government health care program designed principally to help the poor.

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, 1.6 million American children “were living on the street, in homeless shelters or motels, or doubled up with other families last year”. The percentage of children living in poverty in the United States increased from 16.9 percent in 2006 to nearly 22 percent in 2010. One out of every seven mortgages in the United States was either delinquent or in foreclosure during the first quarter of 2010.

The number of children living in poverty in the U.S. has risen for four years in a row. There are 10 different U.S. states where at least one out of every four babies is born to a family living in poverty. 28 percent of all U.S. households have at least one member that is looking for a full-time job. There are seven million children in the United States today that are not covered by health insurance at all.

Hundreds of advocates for families in crisis have called Congress about the proposed fiscal year 2013 budget being debated by the House of Representatives. We have analyzed the budget, and the news is bad for people who are struggling: The proposed budget cuts the highly effective Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by 17 percent over the next 10 years. This will put millions more American families at risk of hunger. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reports that the cuts are so severe that most of the government—aside from health care, Social Security, and defense—would cease to exist by 2050.

The budget severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts comes from these vital programs, while much of the savings goes to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts.

The next 24 hours are crucial as the House of Representatives plans to vote on this budget tomorrow, March 29. Please call your representative now. If the line is busy, please redial and call again. Please let your elected officials in Washington know that you care about children and families.

We can only make a difference when we take action.

“You may never know what results come of your action, but if you do nothing there will be no result. ~ Gandhi

Source(s): Action Alert Voices for Americas Children. Action Alert Bred For the World. St. Vincent de Paul Society. National Center on Family Homelessness

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

…all eyes are turning back to Wisconsin…

The then newly elected Wisconsin governor, Scott Walker reportedly  used his first months in office to punish political opponents, pass tax breaks for the rich, and attack the middle class.These actions lead the citizens of Wisconsin to launch efforts to recall Governor Walker.

The recall of the controversial Governor of Wisconsin, Scott Walker, is drawing near. As Rebuild the Dream reminded us, “all eyes are turning back to Wisconsin”.  In less than three  weeks, people vote whether to recall the infamous Governor Scott Walker. This political showdown should be of importance to all Americans. It will define what is politically acceptable throughout the country, and will set the tone for the 2012 presidential election in November.

This Saturday, thousands of people gathered in Milwaukee for a political rally. On stage at the event were inspiring speakers, musicians and artists. Van Jones, Congresswoman Gwen Moore, indie soul songstress Grace Weber, comedian Lee Camp, and more amazing, local artists, musicians, poets, and community leaders. Hip-hop artist Jasiri X debuted “You’re Fired,” a new song dedicated to Governor Walker.

The purpose of the event was to bring people together to recall Walker, refund Wisconsin, and rebuild the dream. Rebuild the Dream live streamed the entire event on Saturday afternoon. People not familiar with efforts to recall the controversial governor of Walker may ask, what has Wisconsin experienced under the “leadership” of Governor Walker?

Walker’s Impact on 99% of Wisconsinites

Since last year, Governor Walker cut a staggering $1.6 billion from K-12 schools, the biggest public education cuts in the country.  Walker has also gutted public higher education, healthcare for low-income and working families, and collective bargaining rights for teachers, firefighters and cops.

Governor Walker’s  Handouts to the 1%

Walker handed out $2.3 billion in tax cuts for corporations and the super-wealthy, while he increased taxes for working families and seniors by taking away earned-income and homestead tax credits. As a result, it has been reported that state’s economy is reeling. In the last year, Wisconsin lost approximately twenty three thousand nine hundred dollars (23,900) jobs making it fifty first (51st) in the nation in job losses.

On Walker  watch as Wisconsin’s governor, the worst of the 1% have had their way. And the 99% are fighting back in Wisconsin. Wisconsin has shown a riveting force of people power since early 2011. And now Walker could lose his job. This recent political rally held in Wisconsin shows Governor Walker in these final weeks leading up to the recall elections on June 5 that working families in Wisconsin and across the country are more united than ever and ready to stand against the extreme policies that are leading our country in the wrong direction.

In response to Governor Walker’s actions, Wisconsinites came together to nominate Tom Barrett as their Democratic candidate for governor in the recall election. It has been reported that Scott Walker has amassed a war chest of over twenty-five (25 )million dollars – on top of the backing from his special interest allies – meaning  Walker is ready and able to launch a barrage of false attack ads on Tom Barrett his democratic opponent. With that said, keep your eyes on Wisconsin. As previously stated, it will define what is politically acceptable throughout the country, and will set the tone for the 2012 presidential election in November.

Like the event held on Saturday, Rebuild the Dream is reportedly organizing a series of “Revival” events around the country. Rebuild Wisconsin is their biggest one yet. At each Revival, Rebuild the Dream partner with local groups to inspire, connect, and mobilize people around a key local or state issue. For further information on upcoming Rebuild the Dream efforts, please visit the Rebuild the Dream website.

Source(s): Rebuild the Dream

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Say No To The Ryan Budget Plan FY2013

The Ryan budget plan severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Poverty in America not only affects the millions of people who are deprived of the common necessities to live, but it also affects the idea of progression and hopefulness in this country. The more than 46 million people in America living in squalor, poverty, and hunger are not invisible. Their concerns must be our concerns.

If passed, the Ryan budget plan would strike is a very serious blow to vulnerable children and families far into the future. Millions of children are in danger of budget cuts to vital health and income supports. House budget chair Paul Ryan, in his budget plan would rather the money go to defense spending and tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.

Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts in the Ryan Budget Plan comes from vital programs, while much of the savings goes to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts. The members of the house supporting the Ryan budget plan are opting to balance our federal deficit on the backs of the most vulnerable. This proposal fails to create a circle of protection around programs vital for hungry and poor people in our country and abroad.

The Ryan Budget Plan gouges the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by billions, and turns it into a block grant, which would prevent SNAP from responding to economic downturns.  Additionally, the proposed budget cuts the funding levels negotiated by Congress last August, and it eliminates the protections established for all major low-income entitlement programs. It also slashes other crucial programs, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, WIC, and Head Start. International food aid and poverty-focused foreign assistance would also be deeply cut. Cuts to this vital funding would endanger lives and our own national security.

The Ryan plan cuts Medicaid funding by 20 percent next year, gutting a popular program that helps more than 28 million needy children receive care. And Medicaid is slashed by one-third over 10 years. By defunding the Affordable Care Act (health reform), millions more could also lose out on the chance for coverage. Education is hard hit, too, with billions slashed to services kids need to compete in the future. Pell Grants, which help students afford college, would face a budget freeze, and the interest some pay for student loans could double.

As an advocate for indigent children, youth, and families, I see the impact of poverty and need on those that we serve every day. I know first-hand, what poverty and dependence look like and how they destroy lives, hopes, dreams, and aspirations. We pray and cry with children who are hungry and parents who have lost hope. It is what we are, it is what we do.

In spite of the seemingly limitless prosperity that many Americans enjoy, millions of others are going hungry, foregoing medical care, doing without winter coats and gloves, struggling to break free from poverty. Last year, 46.2 million Americans lived below the poverty line – $22,314 a year for a family of four – marking the fourth year in a row that poverty has increased.

With 46.2 million residents, Poverty, USA, is the largest state in America. Today, the unemployment rate stands at 8.6 percent and despite recent economic growth more than 43 million Americans -including 14.7 million children – live in poverty, the highest in the more than 50 years that the data has been tracked. Yet a recent Gallup poll found that only 5% of Americans believe poverty and homelessness are important problems for the country. So let’s look at some facts and make our own determination:

Over 25 percent of the children in the US under the age of six live in poverty. The poverty rate among women climbed to 14.5 percent in 2010 from 13.9 percent in 2009, the highest in 17 years. As poverty surged last year to its highest level since 1993, median household income declined, leaving the typical American household earning less in inflation-adjusted dollars than it did in 1997. One out of every six Americans is now being served by at least one government anti-poverty program.  Child homelessness in the United States is now 33 percent higher than it was back in 2007. More than 50 million Americans are now on Medicaid, the U.S. government health care program designed principally to help the poor.

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, 1.6 million American children “were living on the street, in homeless shelters or motels, or doubled up with other families last year”.  The percentage of children living in poverty in the United States increased from 16.9 percent in 2006 to nearly 22 percent in 2010. One out of every seven mortgages in the United States was either delinquent or in foreclosure during the first quarter of 2010.

The number of children living in poverty in the U.S. has risen for four years in a row. There are 10 different U.S. states where at least one out of every four babies is born to a family living in poverty.  28 percent of all U.S. households have at least one member that is looking for a full-time job. There are seven million children in the United States today that are not covered by health insurance at all.

Hundreds of advocates for families in crisis have called Congress about the proposed fiscal year 2013 budget being debated by the House of Representatives. We have analyzed the budget, and the news is bad for people who are struggling: The proposed budget cuts the highly effective Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by 17 percent over the next 10 years. This will put millions more American families at risk of hunger. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reports that the cuts are so severe that most of the government—aside from health care, Social Security, and defense—would cease to exist by 2050.

The budget severely and disproportionately cuts programs for hungry and poor people. Much of the $4.1 trillion in proposed cuts comes from these vital programs, while much of the savings goes to $4.3 trillion in new tax cuts.

The next 24 hours are crucial as the House of Representatives plans to vote on this budget tomorrow, March 29. Please call your representative now. Use our toll-free number, 1-800-826-3688. If the line is busy, please redial and call again. Please let your elected officials in Washington know that you care about children and families.

We can only make a difference when we take action.

“You may never know what results come of your action, but if you do nothing there will be no result. ~ Gandhi

Source(s): Action Alert Voices for Americas Children. Action Alert Bred For the World. St. Vincent de Paul Society. National Center on Family Homelessness

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Help Vulnerable Families Call Congress

Currently, Congress is deciding whether to extend unemployment insurance benefits past their February 29th expiration date. If they do not reach an agreement, five million workers risk losing their benefits. “The unemployment benefits these struggling families receive kept at least 3.3 million Americans from falling into poverty in 2009 alone, including 1.5 million children.”

It has been reported by the AFL-CIO that the “tea party” politicians are pushing plans to:

  • “Slash federal unemployment funding by more than half in the states with the highest unemployment.
  • Let states whose governments have been taken over by the tea party divert premium money away from unemployment as we know itand use it to experiment with right-wing social engineering programs (like “workfare,” where people are forced to work for free to get unemployment benefits).
  • Mandate drug testing requirements. Politicians are ready to humiliate people who are out of work—by making them urinate in a cup to get benefits they paid for and are entitled to.
  • Make jobless workers pay for their re-employment services. People who are out of work through no fault of their own and have paid into the system aren’t asking for a handout—but a helping hand. Now, the radical lawmakers want to make them to pay for the privilege.
  • Deny benefits to people who never got their high school diploma lose their right to benefits—they’d have unemployment insurance taken out of their paycheck—but will get nothing should they lose their job. Shame!
  • Cut federal employee pensions—or freezing wages for yet another year. Federal workers have already done more than their fair share to balance the budget—while the richest 1% of Americans have been asked to do absolutely nothing.”

Until the national unemployment rate shows measurable signs of improvement and the economy begins generating meaningful numbers of jobs, the program of federal jobless benefits should be continued by Congress. With that said, it is time for each of us to tell our elected officials in Washington to ensure that ALL Americans can weather the current economic storm. To accomplish said goal, call 1-888-245-3381 NOW and ask your elected officials to extend federal unemployment insurance benefits.

9 to 5 prepared this script to assist us in placing this very necessary call to our members of congress. It reads as follows: “When connected to your Congress person’s office, please tell him or her: Your name, where you are from, and that you are a constituent. Please tell _____________ that I’m counting on [him or her] to pass the necessary legislation to extend federal unemployment insurance benefits. Thank you.”

“What is at stake if these benefits are allowed to expire? Over two (2) million women stand to lose this critical lifeline in 2012. More than a quarter of a million of these women are single parents. For many of them, federal unemployment benefits may be the difference between staying afloat and falling into poverty.” We can’t allow politicians to play games with this vital lifeline for hardworking families. Please call or write your Senator today. Tell Congress to extend unemployment insurance through 2012 – without adding difficult, new requirements for unemployed workers.

Hardworking Americans – who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own – could lose benefits that they have paid into and that their families depend on.  As stated previously in this post, some members of Congress are threatening to use this critical deadline to cut unemployment insurance or impose difficult, new restrictions on jobless Americans. You can make the difference in the lives of countless families in your state by calling Washington and urging your elected officials to extend unemployment benefits.  Call and/or write your Senator now. Tell Congress to put their games aside and do what’s right for unemployed workers. Again, please call 1-888-245-3381 today and ask your elected officials in Washington and urge them to act NOW to pass a bill to prevent federal unemployment insurance benefits from being cut off this holiday season.

Source: The National Association of Working Women. AFL-CIO.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Payroll Tax Cut Extension

Today, the Democratic Party sent out an action alert concerning the payroll tax cut extension.  Minutes ago, the Tea Party Republicans blocked a bipartisan bill to extend President Obama’s payroll tax cut. As a result, middle class Americans could see their taxes increase by $1,000 on January 1st UNLESS Speaker Boehner, Eric Cantor and House Republicans back down from their extreme stance on extending the President’s payroll tax cuts.

“The issue right now is this, the clock is ticking. Time is running out […] I saw today that one of the House Republicans referred to what they’re doing as, quote, high stakes poker. He’s right about the stakes — but this is not poker. This is not a game.” – President Obama’s remarks from the White House this afternoon.

It is up to each of us to ensure that voters in our district are aware of the damage that US House Republicans are wreaking on behalf of the Tea Party fringe and the top 1%. Act now. This Republican Tea Party tax increase will hurt the middle class and obstruct the economic recovery. And they know it. Help the Democratic Party hold them accountable.

Source: Democratic Party.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art