Archive | March 2011

Music, Gender, and Globalization

Conference: Music, Gender, and Globalization
Date: 1 to 2 April 2011
Place: Ithaca, NY, USA
Website: http://www.musicgenderglobalization.org
Contact Name: Samuel Dwinell

The conference is organized by two graduate students in the Cornell University Department of Music—Samuel Dwinell and Anaar Desai-Stephens. Many other departments, programs, and institutes from across the humanities and social sciences at the University are also contributing to this project in diverse ways, including co-sponsorship, participation of faculty members and graduate students, and use of space.

This conference will feature three keynote presentations and a number of panels of shorter presentations (chaired by faculty respondents). Other events include a concert by a world-renowned artist and a screening of an important new film. The conference will end with a roundtable discussion of issues raised over the two days. –Music, Gender, & Globalization

Organized by: Cornell University
Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Sources:http://www.musicgenderglobalization.org

Hate Studies

International Conference on Hate Studies
Date: April 6 to 9, 2011
Place: Spokane, WA
Website: http://guweb2.gonzaga.edu/againsthate/Conference2011.htm
Contact name: Jim Mohr
Sponsored by: Institute for Hate Studies

The Second International Conference on Hate Studies builds upon the successful 2004 initial conference. This conference will convene leading academics from multiple disciplines from around the world, law enforcement personnel, journalists, educators, representatives from governmental and non-governmental organizations, human rights experts, community organizers, activists, and others to discuss hatred from multiple perspectives. The “lessons learned” and plans which emerge will help educators, researchers, law enforcement, advocates, and others better analyze and combat hatred in its various manifestations.

Research indicates that thousands of people every year are victims of hate crime. For every reported case of hate violence, there are countless unreported incidents of hate based violence. The hate crime phenomenon presents complex and agonizing problems to countless communities nationwide. The problem has become more visible as federal and state officials increasingly track hate violence.

Some assert that, the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s annual hate crime report offers the most comprehensive national picture currently available on the magnitude of this pressing problem. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SCLC) also monitors hate groups and other extremists throughout the United States and expose their activities. Research indicates that “…there are 932 known hate groups operating across the country, including neo-Nazis, Klansmen, white nationalists, neo-Confederates, racist skinheads, and others.” (Southern Poverty Law Center) According to the research done on this phenomenon by the Southern Poverty Law Center, the number of hate groups is growing. American communities have learned that failure to address hate-based crimes can cause an isolated incident to result in widespread tension.

This year’s theme for the International Hate Studies Conference is Interdisciplinary Approaches to Understanding the Nature of Hate, Crafting Models for Combating Hatred, and Implications for Practice. The conference materials indicate that this theme is being explored through the four main areas of education, research, practice, and advocacy. Papers from different theoretical or disciplinary lenses are invited such as those from history, communications, psychology, social psychology, evolutionary psychology, anthropology, sociology, criminal justice, law, biology, business, economics, theology, religious studies, political science, literature, philosophy, education, and more. Inquiries regarding this conference should be submitted to: againsthate@gonzaga.edu

Source: Gonzaga University, Institute for Hate Studies, Southern Poverty Law Center. Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

Child Witnesses to Violence

Domestic violence is a pressing public health issue. Over 15 million children in our nation live in homes where there has been at least one incident of domestic violence in the past year, and seven million children live in families where severe partner violence has occurred.[i]

Data indicates that 30% to 60% of perpetrators of intimate partner violence also abuse children in the home.[ii] Growing up in abusive household can pose a threat to not only the child’s physical health but his mental health as well.

Research indicates that the non-abusive parent is often one the most important protective factors in the lives of children who witness domestic violence. All women, children, and men have the right to live in a safe environment and to conduct their lives without emotional, physical or sexual abuse or the fear of abuse.

Often, one of the greatest concerns for battered women is the affect of living in a violent home environment on children. In some instances, the domestic becomes so severe that women with children leave their homes without a place to go. Research indicates that domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness. In a 2007 report by the United States Conference of Mayors, thirty-nine percent of the city leaders who were surveyed identified domestic violence as a primary cause of homelessness among households with children.[iii]

Social science research indicates that children’s reaction to witnessing domestic violence may appear immediately after the traumatic event or days or even weeks later. Some children are more vulnerable to trauma than for others. It has been shown that the impact of witnessing a domestic violence incident is likely to have the greatest impact in children or adolescents who have experienced or witnessed other traumatic events.

Children with poor family supports is more at risk for a poor recovery. It is important for children that have witnessed incidents of domestic violence receive counseling to discuss their feelings and ways to keep them safe. To find counseling programs in your area specifically for child witnesses to domestic violence you should reach out to your local domestic violence program.

Source(s): Center for Disease Control and Prevention; McDonald, Renee, Ernest N. Jouriles, Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler, et al. 2006. Estimating the Number of American Children Living in Partner-Violent Families; Edelson, J.L. (1999). “The Overlap Between Child Maltreatment and Women Battering.” Violence Against Women. 5:134-154; U.S. Conference of Mayors. 2007. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities: A 23-City Survey. Washington, DC.

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

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[i] McDonald, Renee, Ernest N. Jouriles, Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler, et al. 2006. Estimating the Number of American Children Living in Partner-Violent Families.

[ii] Edelson, J.L. (1999). “The Overlap Between Child Maltreatment and Women Battering.” Violence Against Women. 5:134-154.

[iii] U.S. Conference of Mayors. 2007. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities: A 23-City Survey. Washington, DC.

HUNGER IN AMERICA


Hunger in America is pervasive. Food security is necessary to lead a productive, healthy, and active life. It has been reported that more than 49 million Americans lack reliable access to the food. Childhood hunger is a growing reality in America. In one of the wealthiest nations in the world, the prevalence of childhood hunger is a national travesty and for many a well kept secret.

Approximately, one in four children in America is food insecure. As is aptly stated in the materials by Share Our Strength i “No Hungry Kid”, “…their bodies may not be rail thin, nor their bellies bloated like their counterparts in other countries, but they’re at risk of hunger all the same. They lack the energy to learn, grow, and thrive.” It is a well known fact that proper nutrition is vital to the growth and development of healthy children.

Statistics on Childhood Hunger in the United States:
• According to the USDA, over 17 million children lived in food insecure (low food security and very low food security) households in 2009. ii
• 20% or more of the child population in 16 states and D.C. are living in food insecure households. The states of Arkansas (24.4 percent) and Texas (24.3 percent) have the highest rates of children in households without consistent access to food. (Cook, John, Child Food Insecurity in the United States: 2006-2008. iii
• In 2009, households that had higher rates of food insecurity than the national average included households with children (21.3 percent), especially households with children headed by single women (36.6 percent) or single men (27.8 percent), Black non-Hispanic households (24.9 percent) and Hispanic households (26.9 percent).v

These heartbreaking facts about the prevalence and the face of hunger in America have drawn the attention of many people including but not limited to Oscar winning actor, Jeff Bridges. Jeff Bridges is serving as the national spokesperson for the “No Kid Hungry Campaign”. To ensure that every child has the opportunity to achieve success, we must first ensure that their most basic needs are met.

To get involved in an anti-child hunger campaign or to gain further information on the prevalence of childhood hunger in America, visit http://www.share.org, http://www.feedamerica.org, and http://www.nokidhungry.org.

Sources: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; U.S. Census Bureau; Feeding America (online); Rhoda Cohen, J. Mabli, F., Potter,Z., Zhoa. Hunger in America 2010. Feeding America. February 2010; Nord, Mark, M. Andrews, S. Carlson. United States Department of Agriculture/Economic Research Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 2008 and 2009; Cook, John. Feeding America. Child Food Insecurity in the United States: 2006-2008; http://www.share.org; http://www.feedamerica.org; http://www.nokidhungry.org; and Food Research and Action Center.

Photo credit Microsoft Clip Art

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iIn 1984, Share Our Strength, was started by the brother and sister team of Bill and Debbie Shore started the organization with the belief that everyone has strength to share in the global fight against hunger and poverty, and that in these shared strengths lie sustainable solutions.

iiRhoda Cohen, J. Mabli, F., Potter,Z., Zhoa. Hunger in America 2010. Feeding America. February 2010.

iiiNord, Mark, M. Andrews, S. Carlson. United States Department of Agriculture/Economic Research Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 2008.

iv Cook, John. Feeding America. Child Food Insecurity in the United States:2006-2008.

vNord, Mark, M. Andrews, S. Carlson. United States Department of Agriculture/Economic Research Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 2009.

Emerging From The Shadows: Loving, Reflecting and Pursuing Justice Together

Emerging From The Shadows: Loving, Reflecting and Pursuing Justice Together
Fifth International PASCH Conference

Date: May 12-15, 2011
Venue: Abbotsford, BC, Canada at the Columbia Bible College.

“In our world, one in four families experiences domestic violence and abuse and the impact of that is felt by all of us.

Paint a mental picture of your Church last Sunday morning. Can you see where everyone is sitting? Looking pretty familiar? Same as the week before?

Now look again. Domestic abuse and violence affects one in four of these people. It’s hard to believe isn’t it? Unfortunately, it’s true.

If one of these people came to you looking for help, would you know where to begin? Most don’t. Which is why Peace and Safety in the Christian Home (PASCH) run ground-breaking conferences aimed at raising awareness and offering practical tools with which to help.

Our upcoming conference, Emerging from the Shadows, to be held […] at Columbia Bible College in the Vancouver area, will address these basic issues.” –Peace and Safety in the Christian Home

For further information on the conference program, schedule, and/or registration options, visit the conference website: http://fromtheshadows.ca/.

Source(s): Emerging from the Shadows; and PASCH.

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art

“Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past”

As Women’s History month draws to a close, we are reminded that National Crime Victims’ Rights Week is fast approaching.

Since 1981, National Crime Victims’ Rights Week (NCVRW) has been held in the month of April. The overarching objectives for National Crime Victims’ Rights Week are as follows: promoting victims’ rights, honoring crime victims, and commending those who advocate on their behalf.

This year’s NCVRW will be observed April 10-16, 2011. According to the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), the theme for National Crime Victims’ Rights Week 2011 is “Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past.”

The Office for Victims of Crime’s website indicates that the 2011 NCVRW Resource Guide is now available online. To obtain information about this year’s National Crime Victims’ Rights Week and to obtain the resource directory and/or register for the event visit the website for the Office for Victims of Crime at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw/.

Sources: The National Center For Victims of Crime; and Office for Victims of Crime (OVC).

Photo credit: Microsoft Clip Art

The State of Children & Families: Building an Effective National Voice

Date: March 27-30, 2011

Contact: state2011@clwa.org.

Information: To obtain further information on this upcoming event, the URL is as follows: http://www.cwla.org/conferences/conferences.htm

According to the CWLA website, the registration process for this event is now open for the CWLA national conference, the State of Children & Families: Building an Effective National Voice. CWLA’s 2011 conference is scheduled for March 27-30, 2011 and is being held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, which is less than 10 minutes from downtown Washington, DC. Note those spouses are now invited with a reduced fee! –CWLA Website

Photo Credit: Microsoft Clip Art