Archive | October 2010

President Obama launches initiative to respond to violence

This week, the Obama administration launched a new initiative to assist employers to respond to domestic and sexual violence. Workplaces Respond to Domestic and Sexual Violence: A National Resource Center is a new initiative that makes it easier for employers to adopt policies to support and protect employees who are victims of domestic and sexual violence. The National Resource Center’s website includes but is not limited to: information on work place violence, guns and the work place, and union responses.

The new Workplace Resource Center was created by a partnership of seven national organizations led by the Family Violence Prevention Fund.   For further information on the new national center, visit Workplaces Respond to Domestic and Sexual Violence: A National Resource Center’s website at http://www.workplacesrespond.org/.

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Nichelle Mitchem Shares Information on the Growing Prevalence of Cyberstalking

The prevalence of stalking is increasing. The Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 3.4 million persons over 18 were victims of stalking in a one-year period. Baum et al, Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report, National Crime Victimization Survey, Stalking Victimization in the United States (January 2009). More than 1 in 4 stalking victims reported some form of cyberstalking was used, such as e-mail (83%) or instant messaging (35%). Id. at 5.  In response to the growing prevalence of cyberstalking, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence provides training and written articles (see STOP Newsletter, Summer 2009) to demonstrate how technology is misused to stalk victims.  If you have any questions or training needs on stalking and technology, you can visit the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s website at www.pcadv.org.

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Nichelle Mitchem discussed “The Battered Woman” by Dr. Lenore Walker

October has long been recognized as National Domestic Violence Awareness month. As a result, many of the post to this blog have been concerning violence against women. Topics discussed have included but not been limited to: domestic violence facts; myths; the importance of safety planning; upcoming conferences; and published works on this pressing public health issue. When discussing books on the topic of domestic violence, we would remise if there was no mention of Dr. Lenore Walker’s famous book “The Battered Woman.” Much like “Getting Free”, “Trauma Recovery and Empowerment”, Dr. Walker’s book “The Battered Woman” is a must read for battered women and their allies in the struggle to eradicate domestic violence.

Dr. Walker has written many books and has been published in countless journal articles, magazines, and newspapers. Her highly regarded book, “The Battered Women, is best known for raising awareness about the phenomenon of domestic violence. Because of Dr. Walker’s inter ground breaking interviews and studies on battered women, she has long been recognized as an expert in on the topic of Battered Women Syndrome. Out of her study of battered women syndrome, Dr. Walker developed theories on how and why domestic violence occurs. She also developed theories on treatment and survival.

Sources: http://www.webster.edu. http://www.stjohns.edu. Photo Credit Microsoft Clip Art

Nichelle Mitchem is talking about “Trauma Recovery and Empowerment: A Clinician’s Guide for Working with Women in Groups”

Much like Ginny NiCarthy’s books “Getting Free” and more recently “You Can End Abuse and Take Back Your Life”, “Trauma Recovery and Empowerment: A Clinician’s Guide for Working with Women in Groups” by Maxine Harris, PhD is a must read for clinicians working with women that have experienced trauma. In the case of Maxine Harris’ book the women may have experienced various forms of trauma including but not limited to domestic violence.

Here’s what others are saying about Trauma Recovery and Empowerment: A Clinician’s Guide for Working with Women in Groups” by Maxine Harris, PhD.

“….I strongly recommend this book and the TREM program for anyone working in community counseling who has clients with a wide variety of needs and little time or resources to create programs to meet everyone’s needs. TREM is a gift to the clients but also a gift to busy counselors and understaffed agencies….”

“…I believe TREM is an invaluable resource. I have a wonderful series of group sessions set out that require a minimum of preparation. The clients in the TREM group can address their concerns in a safe setting. The agency I work for is able to serve many women at once who would receive no trauma counseling if we didn’t have the TREM group. Ideally, it would be best for each woman to have unlimited one on one counseling to address trauma, but that won’t happen because of time and funding and staffing. So TREM is a winning option for everyone. ..”

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Nichelle Mitchem Shares Information on Stalking

Stalking is an increasing problem. Stalking is defined as “a course of conduct directed at a specific person that involves repeated (two or more occasions) visual or physical proximity, nonconsensual communication, or verbal, written, or implied threats, or a combination thereof, that would cause a reasonable person fear” (Tjaden and Thoennes,1998). Stalking behaviors also may include persistent patterns of leaving or sending the victim unwanted items or presents that may range from seemingly romantic to bizarre, following or laying in wait for the victim, damaging or threatening to damage the victim’s property, defaming the victim’s character, or harassing the victim via the Internet by posting personal information or spreading rumors about the victim. As part of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2005, Congress extended the Federal interstate stalking statute to include cyberstalking (18 U.S.C. §2261 A).

The overwhelming majority of stalking victims are women (78 percent), and the majority of offenders (87 percent) are men. Nearly 60 percent of women and 30 percent of men are stalked by a current partner (Tjaden and Thoennes, 1998). The Bureau of Justice Statistics indicates that 3.4 million persons over 18 were victims of stalking in a one-year period. Baum et al, Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report, National Crime Victimization Survey, Stalking Victimization in the United States (January 2009). More than 1 in 4 stalking victims reported some form of cyberstalking was used, such as e-mail (83%) or instant messaging (35%). Id. at 5.

Today, on Ms. Magazine’s Blog, Shawna Kenney made a very informative post entitled, When Domestic Violence Enters Cyberspace.   In the post Shawna aptly states that,”… technology adds a new element of fear to an abused person’s psyche. Haters spew malicious comments beneath YouTube videos, hiding behind screens and usernames; some make thinly-veiled death threats from the perceived safety of their blogs.”  To read her compelling blog post, visit Ms. Magazine’s website at http://www.msmagazine.com.

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Your Used Cell Phone Could Possibly Save Someone’s Life

Verizon collects no-longer-used cell phones, batteries, and accessories and either refurbishes or recycles the phones. The refurbished cell phones along with 3,000 minutes of wireless service are provided to victims of domestic violence.

For many women violence and danger are their constant companions. Research indicates that one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.[i] Indigent women are more vulnerable. As woman rebuild their lives, the refurbished cell phones serve as a link to supportive services in a time of crisis.

The pervasive problem of domestic violence takes everyone to make it stop. Consider donating your used cell phone— you could possibly save someone’s life. For further information about Verizon’s cell phone donation process visit: http://aboutus.vzw.com/communityservice/hopeLine.html


[i] Tjaden, Patricia & Thoennes, Nancy, National Institute of Justice and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, 1993, “Extent, Nature and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence: Findings from the National Violence Against Women Survey,” (2000).Photo Credit Microsoft Clip Art

Nichelle Mitchem Discusses Getting Free

Much like the author’s earlier work Getting Free, this book is a must read for battered women and their allies in the struggle to eradicate domestic violence.

In Getting Free: You Can End Abuse and Take Back Your Life, the author includes new information gleaned from the most recent research on the topic of domestic violence. Getting Free: You Can End Abuse and Take Back Your Life includes an even broader range of topics related to domestic violence than was covered in the author’s first book.

The new book includes an analysis of whether batterers’ treatment really works. It discusses which programs help violent abusers to change and which do not. The author also discusses research on the correlation between domestic violence and child abuse as well as many other topics. For further information, visit Seal Press at http://www.sealpress.com.

Sources: Getting Free. Getting Free: You Can End Abuse and Take Back Your Life. Seal Press.

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